Skip to content

Prostate Cancer: Can Multiparametric MR Imaging Help Identify Patients Who Are Candidates for Active Surveillance?

Prostate Cancer: Can Multiparametric MR Imaging Help

To determine whether multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can help identify patients with prostate cancer who would most appropriately be candidates for active surveillance (AS) according to current guidelines and to compare the results with those of conventional clinical assessment scoring systems, including the D’Amico, Epstein, and Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment (CAPRA) …

[PDF]

Prostate Cancer: Can Multiparametric MR Imaging Help

nance (MR) imaging can help identify patients with pros-tate cancer who would most appropriately be candidates for active surveillance (AS) according to current guide-lines and to compare the results with those of conven-tional clinical assessment scoring systems, including the D’Amico, Epstein, and Cancer of the Prostate Risk As-

The Emerging Role of MRI in Prostate Cancer Active

Turkbey B, Mani H, Aras O, et al. Prostate cancer: can multiparametric MR imaging help identify patients who are candidates for active surveillance? Radiology 2013; 268:144–152 [Google Scholar] 28.

MRI Reclassification of Prostate Cancer for Active

Multiparametric MRI. The role of MRI techniques in the diagnosis, staging and follow up of prostate cancer. Arch Esp Urol. 2015 Apr;68(3):316-33. Guo R, Cai L, Fan Y et al. Magnetic resonance imaging on disease reclassification among active surveillance candidates with low-risk prostate cancer: a diagnostic meta-analysis.

Prostate cancer: can multiparametric MR imaging help

Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate can improve the predictive value of the urinary prostate cancer antigen 3 test in patients with elevated prostate-specific antigen levels and a previous negative biopsy.

MRI IDs candidates for active surveillance of prostate cancer

Multiparametric MRI can help identify appropriate candidates for active surveillance of prostate cancer, performing on par with or better than existing clinical assessment scoring systems, and also improving the sensitivity of those systems, according to a study published online March 6 in Radiology.